Testing

5 things we’ve learned about generating tests from working with the open source community

5 things we’ve learned about generating tests from working with the open source community

We QA check the technology behind Diffblue Cover every single day by writing unit tests for open source public GitHub Java repositories and working closely with repository owners to learn exactly how our tests work (or don’t) for them. Since we began this project, we’ve seen huge advancements in the speed with which we’ve created pull requests and the quality of the tests we’ve generated, and also learned a lot about how to use AI to generate tests that repo owners are happy with. Here are some of our main takeaways from this process so far.

How is test-driven development like French cooking?

How is test-driven development like French cooking?

Mise en place is a philosophy that began in French kitchens, but is now the industry standard for professional chefs around the world. The phrase roughly translates to “everything in its place,” and it boils down to a couple of basic rules: preparing your tools and ingredients before you start cooking, and cleaning as you go. This method mass-produces delicious meals quickly, efficiently, and even elegantly: A master chef in their element is an artist at work.

So how does this relate to software development?

Is testing the most exciting field in software development?

Is testing the most exciting field in software development?

Developers loathe testing. Multiple layers of integration coupled with difficult deployment rules mean that this once-simple process has become cumbersome. But despite its ‘unsexy’ reputation, testing is too important to ignore. This is especially true when we consider emerging technologies. The code base for a self-driving car will have no room for error